Top Ten Playoff Goalie Performances Of All-Time

Top Ten Playoff Goalie Performances Of All-Time

With the Stanley Cup Finals set to begin Monday at 8:00 PM ET, and Boston Goaltender Tuukka Rask posting some of the best numbers to date with a save percentage of .942, a goals against average of 1.84, and two shutouts in 17 games played, let’s take a look at the Top Ten Playoff Goalie Performances of All-Time.

10. Ken Dryden 1971:

Fresh out of Cornell, twenty-three year old Ken Dryden played only six games in the 1970-71 Regular Season, however would be the back bone of a Canadiens team led by Veterans Jean Beliveau, and Frank Mahovlich.

In 20 games played in the Playoffs, Dryden would post a save percentage of .914, and a goals against average of 3.01 off of 709 shots against.

After taking down the defending champions, Boston Bruins, in the First Round in seven games, the Canadiens would go on to play the Chicago Blackhawks in the Stanley Cup Finals.

In the Finals Dryden raised his level of play even more, recording a save percentage of .921, and a goals against average of 3.0 on 228 shots against.

As a Goalie who would not win the Calder Trophy as Rookie of the Year until 1972 due to eligibility requirements, Ken Dryden however would be awarded the Conn Smythe as Playoff MVP, along with winning his first of six Stanley Cups.

9. Dominik Hasek 2002:

In his first season as Goalie of the Detroit Red Wings, Dominik Hasek would play a big roll in Detroit winning their third Stanley Cup in six years.

Although the 2002 Detroit Red Wings team is one of the greatest teams ever put together, and coached by the greatest NHL coach of all-time, Scotty Bowman, Hasek absolutely is one of the many reasons this team is regarded as one of the greatest teams of all-time.

At 36 years old, Hasek would record a goals against average of 1.86, a save percentage of .920, along with six shutouts in 23 games played in the Playoffs.

In the Stanley Cup Finals, we yet again saw the Czech Goalie raise his game to another level, posting a save percentage of .942, a goals against average of 1.40, and a shutout in Game 4.

Detroit would close out the Carolina Hurricanes in a convincing five game Stanley Cup Finals win, capping off one of the most successful seasons in NHL history.

Hasek would go on to win another Stanley Cup with Detroit in 2008.

8. Patrick Roy 1986:

In his rookie season, twenty year old Patrick Roy would play an instrumental role in the Montreal Canadiens winning their 22nd Stanley Cup in franchise history.

Through 20 games played in the Playoffs, Roy would record a goals against average of 1.93, a save percentage of .923, and one shutout.

Although Roy’s numbers dropped a bit in the Stanley Cup Finals, with a save percentage of .904, and goals against average of 2.40, his shutout in Game 4 allowed Montreal to close out the Calgary Flames in just five games.

Patrick Roy would be awarded his first Conn Smythe Trophy as Playoff MVP, and his first of four Stanley Cups as the Canadiens found themselves back on top just seven seasons after Montreal won four consecutive Stanley Cups.

7. Bernie Parent 1975:

Just one year after winning his first Stanley Cup, and Conn Smythe Trophy, Bernie Parent saw no reason to take his foot off the gas pedal.

Parent and the Philadelphia Flyers found themselves back in the playoffs, and ultimately back in the Stanley Cup Finals against the Buffalo Sabres.

In just a fifteen game Stanley Cup run, Parent would record four shutouts, a save percentage of .924, and a goals against average of 1.89.

Against Buffalo in the Stanley Cup Finals, Parent’s numbers stayed relatively the same with a save percentage of .937, and a goals against average of 1.83, although the highlight of his performance would be a shutout in Game 6 as the Broad Street Bullies won their second consecutive Stanley Cup.

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Parent, at the age of 29, would become the first player in NHL history to win back-to-back Conn Smythe Trophies.

6. Jean-Sebastian Giguere 2003:

Goaltender of the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, Jean-Sebastian Giguere would be one of the biggest reasons Anaheim even made it to the Stanley Cup, except for Paul Kariya, and Teemu Selanne.

In a 21 game playoff run, Giguere would record a save percentage of 1.62, a goals against average of .946, along with five shutouts on 697 shots against.

Going up against the New Jersey Devils, who were coming off Stanley Cups in 1995, and 2000, Giguere certainly had his hands full.

Giguere’s stats would drop in the Finals however with him recording a save percentage of .905, and a goals against average of 2.71 in a seven game series.

Recording a shutout in Game 4, the Mighty Ducks would be heading to New Jersey with the series tied 2-2.

Although the Mighty Ducks would fall to the Devils in Game 7, Jean-Sebastian Giguere would be awarded the Conn Smythe as Playoff MVP (over Martin Brodeur).

5. Ron Hextall 1987:

Just two years after falling to the Edmonton Oilers in the Stanley Cup Finals in five games, the Philadelphia Flyers were seeking revenge in a rematch against the Oilers.

In a playoff run that consisted of 26 games, Hextall would record a goals against average of 2.76, a save percentage of .908, along with two shutouts.

(The higher goals against average can be due to the level of scoring that was occurring during this era of the NHL.)

The Stanley Cup Finals went the distance, however Wayne Gretzky, and the Oilers would walk away with their fourth Stanley Cup in five years.

Although the Flyers lost the Stanley Cup, Hextall still was awarded the Conn Smythe as Playoff MVP.

As a twenty-two year old rookie, Ron Hextall would also be awarded the Calder Trophy as Rookie of the Year, the Vezina Trophy as Goaltender of the Year, and named to the NHL First Team All-Star all in 1987.

4. Martin Brodeur 2003:

At age 30, Martin Brodeur, and the New Jersey Devils were seeking their third Stanley Cup in eight seasons.

This Stanley Cup Run went 24 games, with Brodeur recording a save percentage of .934, and a goals against average of 1.65 on 622 shots against.

Brodeur would also set the NHL Record for most shutouts in a single Playoffs, recording seven, including three in the Stanley Cup Finals; that is a record that stands to this day.

Recording shutouts in Games 1, 2, and 7, Brodeur would record a save percentage of .925, and a goals against average of 1.71 in the Stanley Cup Finals against Anaheim.

Keeping this performance from being higher on this list is the fact that Brodeur was pulled in Game 6 after allowing five goals on 22 shots as the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim forced a Game 7 back in New Jersey.

However, Brodeur would bounce back in Game 7, stopping all 24 shots as the Devils took Game 7 3-0, and their third Stanley Cup.

3. Patrick Roy 2001:

Shooting for his fifth Stanley Cup Finals appearance, Patrick Roy went on to have his greatest Playoff performance of his career.

At age 35, Roy would record a save percentage of .934, a goals against average of 1.70, and four shutouts on 622 shots against in a 23 game Stanley Cup Run.

Going against the New Jersey Devils, and Martin Brodeur in the Stanley Cup Finals, the Avalanche certainly had no easy task at hand in taking them down.

With the series needing all seven games, Roy would take his game to another level, recording shutouts in Games 1, and 6, a save percentage of .938, and a goals against average of 1.57.

Not only did this performance help earn Ray Bourque his first Stanley Cup of his career, but it also earned Patrick Roy his fourth Stanley Cup, and third Conn Smythe as Playoff MVP.

2. Jonathan Quick 2012:

Heading into the 2012 Stanley Cup Playoffs, nobody expected much out of the eighth seeded Los Angeles Kings, and Goaltender Jonathan Quick.

However Quick, and the Kings would upset the Presidents’ Trophy winner, Vancouver Canucks, in just five games in the First Round.

From here, Quick was on a mission, earning himself a goals against average of 1.41, and a save percentage of .946, along with four shutouts.

Los Angeles would take on the New Jersey Devils in the Stanley Cup Finals which would go six games.

Jonathan Quick allowed just seven goals in six games, earning himself a goals against average of 1.17, and save percentage of .947, along with a shutout in Game 3.

At age twenty-five, the Connecticut native would win his first of two Stanley Cups with the Kings, as well as the Conn Smythe Trophy as Playoff MVP.

1. Tim Thomas 2011:

Just one year prior to Jonathan Quick guiding the Kings to their first Stanley Cup, Tim Thomas led the Bruins to their first Stanley Cup since 1972 by simply being a brick wall.

In 25 games played, Thomas would face an NHL all-time high 849 shots against, but would still find a way to record a save percentage of .940, and a goals against average of 1.96, with four shutouts to top it off.

Going up against the favored Vancouver Canucks in the Stanley Cup Finals, Thomas raised his game to an unreal level.

In a seven game Stanley Cup Finals, Tim Thomas would earn himself a save percentage of .967, and a goals against average of 1.14 on 246 shots faced.

Even more impressive, Thomas had shutouts in Games 4, and 7 as Boston would win the Stanley Cup 4-0 in Vancouver after forcing Game 7 with a 5-2 Game 6 win in Boston.

At age 36, Thomas would be awarded the Conn Smythe as Playoff MVP.

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