Goaltending in ice hockey is one of the hardest positions to play in all of the sports.

In many cases, a goalie may underperform, but this can be made up for if his team is an incredible scoring team. But also in many cases, a goalie has the ability to completely take over the game and lead his team to a win.

Let’s take a look at my top five goalies of all-time.

5. Ken Dryden:

In the 1970s, Ken Dryden was the epitome of what a goalie was supposed to be.

Playing a total of 397 games, Dryden had a save percentage of .915 percent and a goals against average of 2.40 goals per game.

Dryden won a total of six Stanley Cups with the Montreal Canadiens in 1971, 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978 and 1979; including a Conn Smythe for Playoffs MVP in 1971.

The five-time all-star also was awarded the Vezina Trophy in 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978 and 1979.

Keeping Dryden from being higher on this list is the fact that he was on the Montreal Canadiens in the 1970s, which was one of the most dominant dynasties of all-time. In my opinion, the Canadiens would have been able to win most of those cups even without Dryden due to such a high powered offense.

4. Jacques Plante:

For playing in the 1950s and 1960s, Jacques Plante set the stage for what it takes to be one of the greatest goalies of all time.

Plante played a total of 875 games with a goals against average of 2.38 goals per game.

The eight-time all-star also won a total of six Stanley Cups with the Montreal Canadiens in 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, and 1960.

That’s five Stanley Cups in a row.

And then add seven Vezina Trophies in 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1962, and 1969.

Even more impressive, Plante was awarded the Hart Memorial Trophy in 1962 for league MVP of the year.

Plante did however play during the Original Six era into the Expansion era of twelve teams so one could argue it was not as much of an accomplishment as if he were to do that today with 31 teams.

3. Patrick Roy:

Over the course of 1,029 games, Patrick Roy earned himself a save percentage of .912 percent and a goals against average of 2.54 goals per game. Roy won a total of four Stanley Cups: 1986 and 1993 with the Montreal Canadiens; and 1996 and 2001 with the Colorado Avalanche.Add three Conn Smythe’s cups in 1986, 1993, and 2001 for Playoffs MVP.The eleven-time all-star also was awarded the Jennings Trophy for least goals against among goalies who played a minimum of 25 games, in 1987, 1988, 1989, 1992, and 2002. Roy also was awarded the Vezina Trophy in 1989, 1990, and 1992. Honestly, Patrick Roy and my next goalie are so close when comparing that they could probably be interchanged with each other.

2. Martin Brodeur:

Martin Brodeur played a total of 1,266 games earning himself 691 wins, an all-time record. Over that time Brodeur maintained a save percentage of .912 percent and a goals against average of 2.24 goals per game. Brodeur won a total of three Stanley Cups with the New Jersey Devils in 1995, 2000 and 2003.Add to that nine all-star games, and four Vezina Trophies in 2003, 2004, 2007, and 2008.Like Roy, Brodeur also won the Jennings Trophy five times in 1997, 1998, 2003, 2004, and 2010.

1. Dominik Hasek:

For the 735 games he played, Hasek was one of the most electrifying goalies to ever play the game.

Hasek had a style like no other. It wasn’t butterfly, stand up, or a hybrid. It was simple. Stop the puck.

And Hasek did just that.

Earning himself a save percentage of .922 percent and a goals against average of 2.20 goals per game; both the best among the goalies on this list.

Hasek is also the only goalie to ever win back-to-back league MVP awards as he won the Hart Memorial in 1997 and 1998.

Then add six all-star games and three Jennings Trophies in 1994, 2001 and 2008.

Hasek won two Stanley Cups with the Detroit Red Wings in 2002 and 2008. Then won six Vezina Trophies in 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2001.

Individually, Hasek dominated the 1990s. However, the Buffalo Sabres team he was on was never able to get him that Stanley Cup he so deserved.

When Hasek went to the Detroit Red Wings, the level of his team certainly improved. This helped him achieve the ultimate goal of hoisting the Stanley Cup.

Photo Source:

Featured: www.si.com

Dominik Hasek Save: www.NHL.com

Dominik Hasek Cup: www.hhof.com

Martin Brodeur Cup: whatsupyasieve.com

Martin Brodeur Save: www.si.com

Patrick Roy Stanley Cup MTL: www.pinterest.com

Patrick Roy Stanley Cup COL: www.myhero.com

Jacques Plante Stanley Cup: www.hockeygods.com

Jacques Plante Save: www.NHL.com

Ken Dryden: www.heritagetrust.on.ca

Ken Dryden Save: www.si.com

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One comment

  1. Why is Dryden being penalized for playing with a Canadiens in the 70’s when Plante isn’t for playing with an even more dominant Canadiens team in the 50’s/60’s? Also in the writer’s opinion “In my opinion, the Canadiens would have been able to win most of those cups even without Dryden due to such a high powered offense. If that were true why when Dryden held out in 73-74 did the Canadiens get bounced in the first round in 6 games? The year before Dryden came to the Canadiens they didn’t make the playoffs. After his arrival, they win two cups in his first 3 years. The year he holds out 73-74 they get bounced in 6 games. When Dryden comes back they win cups in 4 of the next 5 years including 4 in a row. After Dryden retires, they get bounced in the first round not winning a single game that year in the playoffs. The Canadiens don’t win another cup until 6 years later. The guy won 6 cups in 8 years. No one has that type of win percentage in hockey. In fact, maybe other than Bill Russell’s 11 of 13 does an athlete come close to Dryden’s win percentage.

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